The CWSE-Prairies logo (top) is a combination of two logos originally designed by Mitch Haw (Left) and Jessee Wise (Right).

The A in Prairies (text on top of the CWSE-Prairies logo) represents a teepee, the traditional home of the Great Plains. Traditionally, women are in charge of the decision making process surrounding the family teepee.

The circle is divided into two parts. Land is represented by the brown lower part. Land is the source of the strong agricultural sector in our Prairies. Water is represented by the blue upper part. Women are the keepers of water according to First Nation tradition.

The CWSE-Prairies logo (top) is a combination of two logos originally designed by Mitch Haw (Left) and Jessee Wise (Right).

The A in Prairies (text on top of the CWSE-Prairies logo) represents a teepee, the traditional home of the Great Plains. Traditionally, women are in charge of the decision making process surrounding the family teepee.

The CWSE-Prairies logo (top) is a combination of two logos originally designed by Mitch Haw (Left) and Jessee Wise (Right).

The A in Prairies (text on top of the CWSE-Prairies logo) represents a teepee, the traditional home of the Great Plains. Traditionally, women are in charge of the decision making process surrounding the family teepee.

The circle is divided into two parts. Land is represented by the brown lower part. Land is the source of the strong agricultural sector in our Prairies. Water is represented by the blue upper part. Women are the keepers of water according to First Nation tradition.

A First Nation woman is seen in the foreground with the feather representing land, water and air, all of which are needed to provide for diversity in life.

There are two other women seen in the logo and together they are looking forward to the East where the sun rises and new opportunities arise for them, their families and communities, and the World.

The women also look at the water that is slowly evaporating from a flask as a warning that we need to take care of this precious resource if we want to keep the earth rotating and all of its inhabitants therein, as represented by the wheel.

Science and engineering (as represented by the flask and wheel), as well as traditional knowledge (as represented by the First Nation woman) can all be seen as essential components to preserving this water and life.